Transfer of an orthodontic case

Transfer of an orthodontic case

Transfer of an orthodontic case

  • Sometimes a patient may have to move during orthodontic treatment. When this happens, new agreements will have to be made with the orthodontist who will take over the case to complete the treatment.
  • Disagreement between patient and orthodontist. It is also possible that a patient may want or need to change orthodontists during treatment for various reasons and not because they can no longer visit for practical reasons such as a move, the practitioner’s retirement, etc. There may have been a misunderstanding between the patient and the orthodontist, a lack of trust that has developed on both sides, a lack of cooperation on the part of the patient that causes the orthodontist to no longer wish to continue treatment, a misunderstanding about the treatment plan, etc. These situations are very rare but when they occur, it greatly complicates the situation for the patient who must find a new orthodontist. When we are asked to continue the corrections made by another orthodontist for such reasons, our first advice is always to try to agree and “reconcile” with the orthodontist who started the case and to complete the treatment with him. This is always the simplest and most cost-effective solution for the patient.
  • When there is a change of orthodontist during treatment, the new orthodontist may respect the initial agreements made with the first orthodontist but is not required to do so. Payment terms may vary from one practice to another.
  • For example, when a case is transferred, the portion of the fees paid by the patient may not be proportional to the treatment provided at the time of the transfer. Depending on the case, the patient may have paid a greater or lesser proportion of the total fees. For example, fees may have been paid in full well before the end of the processing or a smaller portion of the fees (e.g. 60%) may have been paid when the processing is almost complete. It is therefore possible that adjustments may have to be made by the orthodontist and the patient during a transfer.
  • Usually, the orthodontist will evaluate the work done during the transfer and load accordingly. However, patients should understand that these fees are not only related to the length of time spent on treatment. For example, a treatment with an expected duration of 2 years may represent more than 50% of the fees if the case is transferred after 12 months (50% of the estimated duration). This amount will depend on several variables (type of case, orthodontic appliances used, diagnostic equipment, etc.) and may represent 60, 70, 75% of the total amount of the complete treatment (these figures are for example only).
  • As a result, there may be financial adjustments to be made on a transfer; the patient may have to pay an additional amount to what he or she has paid to date for his or her treatment or the orthodontist may have to reimburse a portion of the fees to the patient if he or she considers that he or she has overpaid them. This assessment is done by the orthodontist by evaluating all the aspects described above.
  • Even when a patient does not move to a remote area like another province or country, there may be differences in fees between different orthodontists in different cities. These differences may be even more pronounced between provinces and countries.

 

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